More Draft Notes

DE Harold Landry had 25 career sacks and 10 FFs. He is an explosive edge rusher who can really bend and dip. He reminds me of the 14th pick from last year, Derek Barnett.

Landry is only 6-2, 252 and not everyone likes that size. Landry isn’t going to be an ideal run defender with that build. So what? The guy can get to the QB and that should be the focus. Did anyone watch the Super Bowl? You must have guys who can get to the QB.

Kemoko Turay is somewhat the opposite of Landry. Turay is 6-5, 253. He’s got the length teams love in a pass rusher. Turay is explosive and looks physically dominant at times.

Turay missed most of 2015 and 2016 with injuries. He only finished his career at Rutgers with 14.5 sacks. He never had a forced fumble.

Landry will be picked ahead of Turay, but it is funny to see Landry getting picked apart while Turay is getting built up. Turay opened a lot of eyes with how well he played at the Senior Bowl so he deserves a lot of praise.

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Some people love Texas OL Connor Williams. Injuries affected his play in 2017 and he didn’t look as good as he had in 2016. Plenty of teams will want Williams as an OT, but I think he has the potential to be an outstanding OG.

Williams is a powerful, tenacious run blocker. He can do that from T or G. His pass blocking is effective outside, but you can also see his limitations at times. I think he could be really good inside.

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One of the most interesting players in the 2018 draft is Jaylen Samuels from NC State. I could have referred to him as a TE, FB, RB or H-back. The Wolfpack used Samuels in a variety of roles and he excelled in all of them.

Down in Mobile, Samuels played RB. He looked natural and instinctive as a runner. I would love to see a team use him there. Samuels would probably love to be a hybrid TE, but he’s only 5-11, 223.

Samuels should really be thought of as a weapon more than a standard position. He is an outstanding receiver and solid runner. I hope he goes to a team with a creative offensive staff that can figure out ways to get him the ball. Samuels can become a valuable role player. He can also return KOs and play on STs. Good mid-round prospect.

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Alex Cappa was a dominant LT at Humboldt State. His game tape was crazy, with Cappa just throwing opponents around. It was fun to watch, but didn’t really tell you what to make of him as a pro prospect.

The Senior Bowl was a mixed bag for Cappa. He showed he could play with NFL caliber talent, but also showed his limitations as a pass blocker. He struggled with really quick edge rushers.

Cappa has a chance to play OT in the NFL, but I would love to see him slide inside to OG. He is a very physical player and playing inside would let him focus on that and not explosive edge rushers. Interior rushers are no cake walk, but you at least have them in a confined area and Cappa seems more comfortable with that situation.

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Want a LB who is definitely flying under the radar? Andre Smith from UNC missed most of his Senior season with a torn meniscus in his left knee. Despite that, he still came out early for the draft.

Smith is 6-0, 237. He is a good run defender and shows potential in coverage. He’s smart and just shows a good feel for the game. I think Smith can be a starting MLB in the NFL. He had a full workout at his Pro Day so the knee seems to be in good shape. Obviously the medical grade from teams will be critical for him.

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Need a 2-way TE? It feels like Dalton Schultz from Stanford is flying under the radar. He’s not huge at just 6-5, 244, but you can add weight to that frame. Schultz had a good workout at the Combine, showing the kind of athleticism you want from someone his size.

Schultz only caught 55 passes in three years for the Cardinal, but that had more to do with their passing game than his potential. He is a solid blocker, as you would expect, and has room to grow as a receiver. Could be a solid 5th round pick.

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